Pender Islands Timeline

  • 1939

    Robert Roe Sr. dies on February 8th at the age of 86.

  • 1939

    Canada enters World War II and the Great Depression ends.

  • 1938

    The Anglican Church of the Good Shepherd opens on South Pender as a non-denominational community church on land donated by the Richardsons.

  • 1937

    Several Pender residents put up money to purchase 60 acres of land from George Grimmer (a son of Pender pioneer Washington Grimmer) for the Pender Island Golf and Country Club. These first individuals and many others take out memberships and work hard to plan and develop the layout and build the tees and greens.

  • 1936

    The Hope Bay Store is further enlarged to the rear using lumber salvaged from the dismantled Doukhobor settlement on Piers Island.

  • 1935

    Mr. Sones is the school teacher. A vote is held on 13 July for superior school, with the results 34 for, 16 against. F.C. Smith is elected as Secretary/Treasurer of the School Board.

  • 1934

    Annie Mary, the wife of Spencer Percival, dies at age 73 and is interred at the Pender Cemetery.

  • 1933

    A store and Post Office open on South Pender.

  • 1933

    The prohibition of alcoholic beverages is abandoned in the United States.

  • 1932

    The first Fall Fair is held at the Hope Bay Community Hall.

  • 1932

    Arthur Spalding dies at age 69.

  • 1932

    Mr F. X. Hodgson opens a general store on the present site of Poets Cove Resort. He later adds a few rental cabins and by 1935 is advertising the site as a resort.

  • 1932

    The fish reduction plant at Shingle Bay declares bankruptcy but is reconstituted under new management. It continues to operate until it is destroyed by fire in 1959.

  • 1932

    Captain B.G. Amies replaces Major Bogs (?) as school trustee. Miss Dickson is the teacher.

  • 1931

    The eleven members of the Women's Missionary Society of the Pender Island United Church of Canada host a 'wool teasing bee'.

  • 1931

    Robert Stewart Wallace Corbett of the Hope Bay Store retires. His son Percy becomes Postmaster and takes over running the store, assisted by his son Stuart. The store is sold in 1956. Percy remains Postmaster until 1961.

  • 1930

    Washington Grimmer dies close to the age of 80.

  • 1930

    The Maples' resort at Port Browning, operated by Mrs. Elisha Pollard, opens for guests. It runs until 1970, when guests are no longer accommodated in the main house.

  • 1930

    The ferry 'Island Princess', originally named the 'Daily', is sold to the Gulf Island Ferry Co., and converted to a motor vessel with a diesel engine. It is renamed 'Cy Peck' after the father of Ed Peck, chairman of the Compensation Stabilization Program. The boat is put on the Swartz Bay-Saltspring Island run.

  • 1930

    During the Depression, guests at Roesland Farm Resort dwindle. Some years, only the Davidsons come to stay. Robert and Margaret Roe are land rich, but financially poor during this time. Farm operations are important in surviving the Depression.

  • 1930 (about)

    Warburton Pike's house on Saturna Island, on the site of the current Thomson Park, is destroyed by fire.

  • 1929

    A herring saltery plant is built at Otter Bay (then called Hayashi Cove) by the British Columbia Fish Salteries Ltd., controlled by the Matsuyama Co., a Japanese interest. Herring is packed in boxes of salt and shipped to the Far East.

  • 1929

    Alexander Brackett dies of 'black lung' disease caused by the rock dust he worked in for a great part of his life.

  • 1929

    Peter Huffman, owner of an 80 acre farm property located near Roe Lake, passes away. Peter came to Pender from Ontario. He was in his fifties and most likely bound for the Klondike Gold Fields, but he stopped on Pender to visit his wife's sister, Margaret Brackett, and he never left the island. He became known as "the old man who lived inland and rode his horse to sell apples from his orchard and eggs to his neighbours."

  • 1929

    The stock market crashes, leading to the Great Depression of the 1930s.

  • 1929

    Andreas Stihl patents the first gas-powered handheld mobile chainsaw for wood.

  • 1928

    Beautyrest Lodge, or 'Mille Fleurs', is built as a private residence for Maj. Boyer.

  • 1928

    The Hope bay Store is modernized with an electric plant, frigidaire and ice cream cabinet.

  • 1928

    Miss Graham is the school teacher.

  • 1927

    Robert (Bert) Roe Jr weds 31-year-old Irene Burnes, a former guest of Roesland, and builds a house of his own at Roesland. The back portion of the house is fitted out as a store for the convenience of resort patrons in the summer and for commercial fishermen in the winter.

  • 1927

    Major General Frank Sutton, known as 'one arm Sutton', buys Portland Island with gambling proceeds and dreams of raising and training thoroughbred horses, as well as building a hotel, summer cottages and even a golf course. The stock market crash of 1929 ends his dream.

  • 1927

    Miss Small leaves her post as teacher in May, and Miss Dee replaces her.

  • 1926

    The school opens on South Pender. On North Pender, Miss Helen Boyd is the teacher. There are forty applications for positions, and Miss Horner and Miss Small are chosen.

  • 1926

    The fish reduction plant is reactivated at Shingle Bay (Pender Island Fish Products of Victoria) for lubricating oil, fertilizer and fish meal. Previously, Shingle Bay had a small cedar shingle enterprise. The fish plant was built in the early 1920s, then shut down for a few years.

  • 1926

    Dave Davidson makes his first visit to Roesland at age six, and is met by Robert Roe Sr in his launch. He later becomes the owner of Roesland.

  • Mid 1920s

    The Coast Shale Company brick factory at Bricky Bay is demolished.

  • 1925

    After the Act of Union between the Presbyterian and Methodist Churches, the congregation of the Presbyterian church at Hope Bay votes to join the United Church of Canada.

  • 1924

    Mr and Mrs Spencer Percival host a tennis garden party. A cup is presented to the winner of the matches.

  • 1924

    Miss Hayward is the school teacher.

  • 1924

    The Grosvenor House Hotel is built by the Logan family directly across from the General Store at Port Washington. It operates as a hotel for 27 years.

  • 1923

    The federal government prohibits Chinese immigration.

  • 1922

    Miss Vivienne Geldart arrives as the second school teacher. She marries Victor Menzies the next year. Miss Corbett and Miss Merton (?) carry on the teaching, as two teachers are now required.

  • 1921

    The manse is built at Hope Bay. It is still standing today.

  • 1921

    Miss Ina Tait teaches at the Pender School in September. She is replaced by Charlotte Thompson.

  • 1921

    A B.C. Government Liquor Stores opens on Pender. Sixty-two years later, a government liquor store opens at the Driftwood Centre.

  • 1921

    John Blake Bridge becomes the Postmaster at Port Washington.

  • 1920

    The Harris family leaves Pender, and Albert Menzies retires to Howard Harris house at Hope Bay. For 10 years, his son Victor leases then purchases the farm named 'Valley Home Farm'.

  • 1920

    Miss Miller is the school teacher until April. She is replaced by Miss Alexander, who teaches until July.

  • 1920

    The Coast Shale Company brick factory at Bricky Bay is closed and placed under caretaker status until its demolition in the mid-1920s.

  • 1920

    The prohibition of alcoholic beverages is introduced in the United States.

  • 1920s

    The Canadian Pacific Steamship (CPSS) line begins regular service to the Gulf Islands, featuring the S.S. Princess Mary.

  • 1920s

    Robert Roe's youngest son, Bert Roe, becomes a partner in the operation of the farm and developing cabin resort at Roesland.

  • 1919

    The first cottage, built in 1910, is rented at Roesland to the Gordon Gray family of Vancouver.

  • 1919

    Arthur Spalding sights a plane flying over his farm on South Pender for the first time on May 12th.

  • 1918

    John M. MacDonald dies at age 74 and is interred at the Pender Cemetery. His wife Jessie lives until 1953. She passes away at 93 years of age.

  • 1918

    Waterlea is purchased by Capt John Muus and his daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. A.E. Craddock.

  • 1918

    The ship 'Daily' is purchased by the Canadian Pacific Steamship Lines and refitted. It is re-named the Island Princess and is operated by the CPR in the Gulf Islands until sold in 1930 and renamed the Cy Peck.

  • 1918

    The first planned subdivision on Pender is registered by John MacKinnon on land purchased from Mr. Hayashi.

  • 1918

    Women get to vote in provincial elections for the first time.

  • 1918

    George Roe, son of Robert Roe, leaves Pender Island with his family at age 35 and moves to Thetis after land troubles with his father. The family remains there until 1923.

    George had been making payments to his father for one third of the Roesland property - 200 acres. Yet when it comes time to claim his share, the property is in his father's name. George takes his father to court and ends up with only the 20 acres he has cleared and built a house on. His eldest brother William also has difficulties with his father over joint ownership and/or an agreement to purchase 200 acres, on which he planned to settle and build a gas station and marina. William also finds out that the property is in his father's name and not jointly held. He too takes his father to court, but is unsuccessful.

  • 1918

    Prohibition begins by referendum.

  • 1916

    The Canadian Department of Indian Affairs outlaws reef nets used by the Salish Nation for centuries, yet allows J.H. Todd and Sons to use nets fixed to the sea bed, which are similar to native reef nets. Todd and Sons continues this practice from 1916 until the mid-1940s, when B.C. Packers buys them out and discontinues it.

  • 1915-16

    There is a major snowfall on the island.

  • 1915

    The St. Peters Anglican Church is built on Port Washington Road on an acre of land donated by Spencer Percival. The first service is held in July.

  • 1915

    Hugh Hamilton enlarges his house at Port Browning after his marriage.

  • 1915

    Godfrey Walker of South Pender is killed in action in World War One. He is survived by his brother Wilfred.

  • 1915

    Dr. Aldridge, a retired physician, arrives on Pender and purchases a parcel of land stretching from the Canal and Sharks Cove to the junction of Canal and Aldridge roads. This includes the properties currently containing the school, medical centre and Plum Tree Court.

  • 1915

    Additions to the Parliament Buildings are completed in Victoria.

  • 1914

    From a total population of just over 200, 60 Pender Islanders serve in the First World War. Ten do not return, including William Ross Brackett, who dies of battle wounds on August 19, 1917.

  • 1914

    Spencer Percival resumes the Postmaster duties at Port Washington.

  • 1914

    The S.S. Queen City takes over ferry service from Sidney, but the service is not as regular as it was when the Iroquois was running.

  • 1913

    Jeannie Hamilton runs for school trustee and becomes the first woman to run for public office on Pender. She loses to Elijah Pollard.

  • 1913

    Rutherford Hope dies on July 14th.

  • 1913

    The ship 'Daily', later renamed 'Cy Peck', is built by Matthew McDowell in Seattle, WA, for service between Seattle and Tacoma.

  • 1913

    Chas A. Gaunt becomes the Postmaster at Port Washington.

  • 1912

    The Coast Shale Brick Company opens a brick factory on 50 acres (now Bricky Bay) and employs 75 men, using stiff mud Cretaceous clay and oil-fired scove kilns.

  • 1912

    The North Pender schoolhouse is raised by a brick foundation to add lower level services and storage.

  • 1912

    A third Post Office is established on Pender at Port Washington, with Spencer Percival as the postmaster. Postal Address: Port Washington BC.

  • 1912

    A larger, more imposing second Hope Bay Store and two small warehouses are built by R.S.W. Corbett.

  • 1912

    The Port Washington Community Hall is built on leased land at the corner of Port Washington Road and Otter Bay Road. It is demolished in 1977 when the lease draws to a close.

  • 1912

    The Maples' resort is built for Elijah Pollard on the shore of Port Browning. With the addition of three rustic cabins in the 1920s, Maples' operated as a summer resort until the 1970s.

  • 1912

    Julie Roache, the wife of Lawrence Auchterlonie, dies at age 59 and is interred at the Pender Cemetery.

  • 1912

    On February 6th, George Roe, one of the three Roe sons, marries Myrtle Jenkins/Beddis. They have two daughters, one born in December of this year and the second in December 1914, both on Pender.

  • 1912

    The Canadian Northern Pacific railway inaugurates a new Gulf Island ferry service from Sidney, with the steamer S.S. Joan.

  • 1911

    The Coast Shale Brick Company purchases 50 acres at what is now Bricky Bay and subsequently employs up to 75 men who are accommodated on site. To this day, bricks remain embedded in and scattered on the beach.

  • 1911

    The S.S. Iroquois sinks in a squall off of Sidney. Twenty-one people drown, including Pender school teacher Fanny Hooson, 38, (ne Lawson), her 3 year old son, and several new workers for Coast Shale Brick Factory. The ferry capsized three years earlier but was returned to service. The initial capsizing should have been a warning of the vessel's unseaworthiness when overloaded.

  • 1911

    The first telephone service arrives on the Penders.

  • 1911

    Washington Grimmer, age 60, divides his farm among his children.

  • 1911

    Lyall Thatcher Brackett is born on Pender on March 28th. He is child number seven in the family and the last of the Brackett kids to be born on Pender. Grandma Brackett is 52 when she has this last baby.

  • 1910

    The Port Washington Store is opened by Spencer Percival. He and successive owners Jack Bridge and Wally Cunliffe continue to host a jovial evening just before Christmas featuring a modified bicycle wheel fashioned into a 'Wheel of Fortune' roulette draw for bags of groceries. This practice continues until 1965. The wheel is on display at the Museum.

  • 1910

    The Community Hall is built at Hope Bay, overlooking the Corbett Store.

  • 1910

    Waterlea is built by John MacKinnon at the west end of what is now MacKinnon Road.

  • 1910

    Fred Smith comes to Pender. After WWl, he buys acreage at Welcome Bay and marries the eldest daughter of Alexander Hamilton.

  • 1910

    The Hugh Hamilton house is built at the end of Port Browning. It's still standing today.

  • 1910

    On May 4th, Winifred and Ralph Grey leave Samuel Island with their family, bound for Victoria.

  • 1909

    The Hope Bay Community Hall is built (early 1910?). The Hall is dismantled in 1967.

  • 1908

    Wilfred and Godfrey Walker arrive from England to South Pender. They purchase land on Plumper Sound in 1909 and build cabin a year later (it's still standing today).

  • 1908

    The ferry S.S. Iroquois capsizes at Nanaimo, but is righted and put back into service.

  • 1908

    Robert Roe Sr. builds a farm house at Roesland from a Victoria Lumber and Manufacturing Co. kit. It costs $538.66 and takes a week to build. The house is now the site of the Pender Islands Museum.

  • 1906

    In 1906-07, regular Anglican services begin in the Spalding family home, held by the Rev. Hubert St. John Payne, also known as "Parson Payne" (who opened a Saturna Island chapel in 1904).